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Why Don’t My Comments Get Approved?

I saw an interesting question in a forum this week: Why don’t the comments I leave on blogs get approved?

I can only speak for myself, but here are some of my thoughts, for what they’re worth:

I get a lot of comments that are clearly there just for the link. I mean screamingly, obviously just for the link.

They don’t add any value to the article at all and, 99.9% of the time, the sites that they link back to are either biz opp sign up pages or shopping cart sites.

Depending on the content of the comment, I either delete it or mark it as spam.

I make it clear in my About page that, although I have a pretty liberal comment approval policy, I have zero tolerance for comments that are there just for the link.

My site is my place. I have no obligation to approve comments. Any comments.

But, as I make clear in my About page, if a comment adds to the conversation and clearly has thought and insight behind it, it will be approved.

And, BTW, I don’t have a lot of comments on this blog. Which is absolutely fine by me. I’d rather have one valuable comment on a post than 10 pointless ones.

Looked at from the other side, I don’t comment on a lot of blogs.

But those that I do comment on are ones where I’ve spent some time and where I’ve developed a feel for the blog and its followers.

I do that before I start making comments.

That enables me to get to ‘know’ the community a little bit and to get a sense of what’s going on.

It’s no different from joining a new forum – I follow the same approach. I spend some time looking around and getting a sense of the culture of the place before jumping in with comments.

Nothing wrong with using Comment Kahuna and other tools like that to find blogs in your niche. But my suggestion would be that, once you find relevant blogs, you spend some time finding out the lay of the land before making comments.

And, when you do make comments, be sure they add value to the conversation – meaning add some new information, or a different view point.

Think of a comment as a blog post. On a couple of articles on this site there’s more and better information in the comments than there is in the original article.

So there’s no reason why you couldn’t turn a good quality comment into a blog post.

Do that, and link back to the blog you made the original comment on, and you’re starting to build a relationship with that blogger.

Then your comments will be approved – pretty much every time.

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Comments on this entry are closed.

  • Nick 9 October, 2009, 1:46 am

    Blogs are run by people called bloggers. There’re bloggers try to do something good for their blogging and succeed it. There’re others trying to do something good but fail some time; and there’re still others just don’t do anything really good for blogging at all. Because there being people just doing something like leaving comments on your blog doesn’t mean that they’re doing the things they’re supposed to do to comment. They just take use of commenting to get their links known, but for nothing. Why are you doing something to get your link known as a link to senseless?
    .-= Nick´s last blog ..Do You Miss “Saigon Red”? =-.

    • WealthyDragon 9 October, 2009, 6:56 am

      Nick, hi,

      Thanks – my point was that (at least as far as my blog is concerned) if people are genuinely interested in the article, have their own views on it (all the better if their views are different from mine) and make thoughtful comments they’re more likely to be approved.

      Certainly that’s the case on this site, and some of the best comments are where people have had opposing views to mine and we’ve had a lengthy discussion as a result.

      In my experience that’s the case on many blogs.

      ‘Hit and run’ comments are not approved here – especially when they’re only there to get a link to some business opportunity sign up page.

      Cheers,

      Martin.

  • Brad Harmon 19 October, 2009, 2:31 pm

    Martin,

    I comment on other blogs for many reasons. I actually have a goal that I have set for myself each week with the number of comments that I would like to make. The primary benefit to me with this goal is getting links back to my site. It is one of my top advertising strategies and I am quite open about it.

    I probably should spend more time getting to know the blog before I post, but to be honest it is the old “touch it once” approach that prevents me from doing this. If I do not comment on the post after reading it then I am not going to spend time looking for it again to comment on it later.

    I think it is sad that many bloggers employ this strategy very poorly. Leaving a “nice post” comment for the link (even on a do follow blog) is not likely to get indexed any time soon. They miss that the real value in commenting on other’s blogs is that it is a free advertisement to showcase who you are and what type of blog they will see if they follow the link to your site.

    You can only do this through thoughtful comments. I believe that what you sow you will also reap. I hope that when I leave a comment others will leave the same quality of comment on my blog. My comments link my credibility to that blog, and hopefully I am adding value in the process.

    I am not satisfied with just a few comments on my blog. For me, this means that I have not been engaging enough in giving value through my blog post or my comments on other’s blogs.

    I am proud of my comment quota because I know that without it I would just be a reader like so many others, and this would prevent me from being an encouragement to the author.

    Brad
    .-= Brad Harmon´s last blog ..Featured Video: Zig Ziglar on Setting Goals (3 of 3) =-.

    • WealthyDragon 19 October, 2009, 8:59 pm

      Absolutely no question about the benefit of commenting – it’s been proven time and again that it gets lots of visitors.

      But your point about thoughtful comments is so important.

      And there’s not an absolute need to discover the lay of the land at first. That comment was in response to the person asking the original question that I referred to. He (I think it was a ‘he’) had spend a lot of time finding blogs through Comment Kahuna, leaving comments and moving on to the next one.

      I honestly don’t know what kind of comments he left because he didn’t say, but the way he wrote his question left me with clear impression that it was pretty much a ‘hit and run’ approach he was taking.

      I could be quite wrong about that, of course!

      But the positioning of his question reminded me very strongly of so many of the comments I get on this blog. As an example, I got one yesterday that agreed that the plugin I’d referred to was great – but I hadn’t referred to any plugin at all..!

      They clearly hadn’t read the post because the entire comment was completely off-topic.

      Those are the comments I have absolutely zero patience for.

      But I seriously respect you for the time you put into commenting – I’ve said it before and I’ll say again: I KNOW I should do a LOT more than I do! You can teach me a thing or two in that respect 🙂

      Cheers,

      Martin.